Friday, May 22, 2020

Animal Research Animal Testing - 1711 Words

JT Forster Forster 1 Mr. Malcolm English 11 07/31/2013 Animal Testing Imagine being poked and prodded with a needle, all to test for a new drug against bacteria. Would that be okay if the medicine being used would eventually save countless lives? This is the one of the many issues behind the debate that is animal research. Some people argue for models, taking the use of animals completely out of the research equation, while others advocate the continued use of animals, only if a standard level of care is set. Ever since the late 1960’s and the early 1970’s, animal research has been under extreme fire for what they do. This is mainly due to the many changing perspectives on the relationship between humans and the other aspects of the world that are surrounding them. There are many main reasons for this change, but the main reason is the different ideas that surrounded the use and exploration of animals in laboratories is what is being brought into question. The reasons for this becomes even more cleare r when the time period gets examined. Close to the time when the fight against animal research was taken up, there was huge growth in almost all of the areas of the scientific world, which caused a huge increase in the knowledge known about the world. The spread of ideas was spread very quickly through new advances in technology that came along. This ensured that everything bestowed by the scientist toShow MoreRelatedAnimal Research And Testing : The Importance Of Animal Testing1441 Words   |  6 Pageshuman morality their ability to further the research often became limited. It was essential for scientists to better understand medical related issues, so they started to perform their hypothesized experiments on specific animals. The data recovered led to a discovery that certain species’ genetic, biological and behavioral characteristics closely resemble those of the human race, allowing us to replicate many symptoms of human conditions. Although animal experimentation may seem morally wrong, asRead MoreAnimal Research : Animal Testing1711 Words   |  7 Pages07/31/2013 Animal Testing Imagine being poked and prodded with a needle, all to test for a new drug against bacteria. Would that be okay if the medicine being used would eventually save countless lives? This is the one of the many issues behind the debate that is animal research. Some people argue for models, taking the use of animals completely out of the research equation, while others advocate the continued use of animals, only if a standard level of care is setRead MoreAnimal Research : Animal Testing1700 Words   |  7 Pages11 07/31/2013 Animal Testing Imagine being poked and prodded with a needle, all to test for a new drug against bacteria. Would that be okay if the medicine being used would eventually save countless lives? This is the one of the many issues behind the debate that is animal research. Some people argue for models, taking the use of animals completely out of the research equation, while others advocate the continued use of animals, only if a standard level of care is setRead MoreMedical Research On Animal Testing1736 Words   |  7 Pagesprogress can be judged by the way its animals are treated†. Medical research on animals is an effective way for scientist to test different medical discoveries and experiment before using them on humans to check their result. This technique has been used for centuries dating back to people such and Aristotle and Erasistratus. What exactly is medical research on animals? When we take a deeper look into the experiment that are preformed we can conclude that animals are a living model of humans in theseRead MoreThe Use Of Animals For Research Testing Essay15 47 Words   |  7 Pagesother. With hundreds of topics to solve, there was one that stood out, animal testing. The use of animals for research testing is an issue that has been debated whether or not it is acceptable or not. Within this questionable topic, our main focus is on the researchers, animals, users, and environment. Terms that you may associate with animal testing would vary greatly, but there are some that can be used as an example such as testing, experiment, abuse, negligence, and acceptable. Have you ever thoughtRead More The Cruelty of Animal Research, Testing, and Experimentation1381 Words   |  6 PagesThe Cruelty of Animal Testing and the Need for Alternative Methods In his book Inhumane Society: The American Way of Exploiting Animals, Dr. Michael W. Fox estimates that twenty-five to thirty-five million animals are used in the United States each year for laboratory testing and research (58). Research involving tests done on animals is unnecessary and cruel. More humane methods of research need to be employed. Fox states that animal tests on cosmetics and household products are nothingRead MoreAnimal Testing And The World Of Scientific Research1746 Words   |  7 PagesAnimals used in laboratories dates as far back as the 17th century (Unknown, 2015)6. When I first read this statistic, it was surprising because the amount of time testing has been around really makes one think about the advancements made because of that. Due to the amount of time animal testing has been around, two general groups have formed in response to this. The people advocating for it are commonly part of the science community or anyone that supports what science hopes to accomplish and thenRead MoreThe Ethical Dilemma Of Animal Testing And Research1775 Words   |  8 PagesEthical Dilemma of Animal Testing and Research Israel Parra Perez English 101 – Section 10451 Professor Leonard Macias 7 May 2017 â€Æ' Outline Thesis: Animal testing and research should cease because animals are subjected to cruel inhumane procedures by researchers, viable alternatives exist for animals testing, and results obtained through animal testing are mostly flawed and unreliable. I. Introduction and Thesis II. Animal Testing and Research Practices Leaves Animals Vulnerable to MistreatmentRead MoreWe Must Stop Animal Research and Animal Testing Essay1538 Words   |  7 Pagesmillion animals are killed each year due to animal testing? What if I told you that these animals are burned, crippled, abused and poisoned on a regular basis? What if I told you that in order to obtain your favorite shampoo, hand sanitizer, lotion, etc. that innocent animals must be tortured? Throughout history animal research and experimentation has played a key role in scientific benefit and discovery. Even I cannot deny the numerous medical breakthroughs that have been founded using animals as testRead MoreEssay on Animal Testing in the Research Field1416 Words   |  6 PagesAnimal research, or animal testing, is the use of animals in scientific researches to study and develop drugs for the life-taking diseases that human beings contract. It has been practiced for hundreds of years. Animal testing helps pro duced many vaccines and other drugs, like penicillin, and thus, save many human lives. On the other hand, animal testing also causes pain and kills a lot of animals used during the researches that many people oppose this practice. Supporters show their support, while Animal Research Animal Testing - 1711 Words JT Forster Foster 1 Mr. Malcolm English 11 07/31/2013 Animal Testing Imagine being poked and prodded with a needle, all to test for a new drug against bacteria. Would that be okay if the medicine being used would eventually save countless lives? This is the one of the many issues behind the debate that is animal research. Some people argue for models, taking the use of animals completely out of the research equation, while others advocate the continued use of animals, only if a standard level of care is set. Ever since the late 1960’s and the early 1970’s, animal research has been under extreme fire for what they do. This is mainly due to the many changing perspectives on the relationship between humans and the other aspects of the world that are surrounding them. There are many main reasons for this change, but the main reason is the different ideas that surrounded the use and exploration of animals in laboratories is what is being brought into question. The reasons for this becomes even more cl earer when the time period gets examined. Close to the time when the fight against animal research was taken up, there was huge growth in almost all of the areas of the scientific world, which caused a huge increase in the knowledge known about the world. The spread of ideas was spread very quickly through new advances in technology that came along. This ensured that everything bestowed by theShow MoreRelatedAnimal Research And Testing : The Importance Of Animal Testing1441 Words   |  6 Pageshuman morality their ability to further the research often became limited. It was essential for scientists to better understand medical related issues, so they started to perform their hypothesized experiments on specific animals. The data recovered led to a discovery that certain species’ genetic, biological and behavioral characteristics closely resemble those of the human race, allowing us to replicate many symptoms of human conditions. Although animal experimentation may seem morally wrong, asRead MoreAnimal Research : Animal Testing1700 Words   |  7 Pages11 07/31/2013 Animal Testing Imagine being poked and prodded with a needle, all to test for a new drug against bacteria. Would that be okay if the medicine being used would eventually save countless lives? This is the one of the many issues behind the debate that is animal research. Some people argue for models, taking the use of animals completely out of the research equation, while others advocate the continued use of animals, only if a standard level of care is setRead MoreAnimal Research : Animal Testing1711 Words   |  7 Pages11 07/31/2013 Animal Testing Imagine being poked and prodded with a needle, all to test for a new drug against bacteria. Would that be okay if the medicine being used would eventually save countless lives? This is the one of the many issues behind the debate that is animal research. Some people argue for models, taking the use of animals completely out of the research equation, while others advocate the continued use of animals, only if a standard level of care is setRead MoreMedical Research On Animal Testing1736 Words   |  7 Pagesprogress can be judged by the way its animals are treated†. Medical research on animals is an effective way for scientist to test different medical discoveries and experiment before using them on humans to check their result. This technique has been used for centuries dating back to people such and Aristotle and Erasistratus. What exactly is medical research on animals? When we take a deeper look into the experiment that are preformed we can conclude that animals are a living model of humans in theseRead MoreThe Use Of Animals For Research Testing Essay15 47 Words   |  7 Pagesother. With hundreds of topics to solve, there was one that stood out, animal testing. The use of animals for research testing is an issue that has been debated whether or not it is acceptable or not. Within this questionable topic, our main focus is on the researchers, animals, users, and environment. Terms that you may associate with animal testing would vary greatly, but there are some that can be used as an example such as testing, experiment, abuse, negligence, and acceptable. Have you ever thoughtRead More The Cruelty of Animal Research, Testing, and Experimentation1381 Words   |  6 PagesThe Cruelty of Animal Testing and the Need for Alternative Methods In his book Inhumane Society: The American Way of Exploiting Animals, Dr. Michael W. Fox estimates that twenty-five to thirty-five million animals are used in the United States each year for laboratory testing and research (58). Research involving tests done on animals is unnecessary and cruel. More humane methods of research need to be employed. Fox states that animal tests on cosmetics and household products are nothingRead MoreAnimal Testing And The World Of Scientific Research1746 Words   |  7 PagesAnimals used in laboratories dates as far back as the 17th century (Unknown, 2015)6. When I first read this statistic, it was surprising because the amount of time testing has been around really makes one think about the advancements made because of that. Due to the amount of time animal testing has been around, two general groups have formed in response to this. The people advocating for it are commonly part of the science community or anyone that supports what science hopes to accomplish and thenRead MoreThe Ethical Dilemma Of Animal Testing And Research1775 Words   |  8 PagesEthical Dilemma of Animal Testing and Research Israel Parra Perez English 101 – Section 10451 Professor Leonard Macias 7 May 2017 â€Æ' Outline Thesis: Animal testing and research should cease because animals are subjected to cruel inhumane procedures by researchers, viable alternatives exist for animals testing, and results obtained through animal testing are mostly flawed and unreliable. I. Introduction and Thesis II. Animal Testing and Research Practices Leaves Animals Vulnerable to MistreatmentRead MoreWe Must Stop Animal Research and Animal Testing Essay1538 Words   |  7 Pagesmillion animals are killed each year due to animal testing? What if I told you that these animals are burned, crippled, abused and poisoned on a regular basis? What if I told you that in order to obtain your favorite shampoo, hand sanitizer, lotion, etc. that innocent animals must be tortured? Throughout history animal research and experimentation has played a key role in scientific benefit and discovery. Even I cannot deny the numerous medical breakthroughs that have been founded using animals as testRead MoreEssay on Animal Testing in the Research Field1416 Words   |  6 PagesAnimal research, or animal testing, is the use of animals in scientific researches to study and develop drugs for the life-taking diseases that human beings contract. It has been practiced for hundreds of years. Animal testing helps pro duced many vaccines and other drugs, like penicillin, and thus, save many human lives. On the other hand, animal testing also causes pain and kills a lot of animals used during the researches that many people oppose this practice. Supporters show their support, while

Thursday, May 7, 2020

The Effects of Adoption on a Family Essay - 1156 Words

There are common ordeals and situations that can trouble a family emotionally, physically, and psychologically. Adoption is one situation a family must encounter when a child is born without a proper system of support to sustain life after birth. The causes for a family to make a heartfelt decision to place a child for adoption can have dramatic effects on the birth parents, adoptive parents, and child (Adoptee), even if the decision is meant for the best. The birth parents are affected by the thought of loss of a child due to the adoption placement procedure during pregnancy because their unplanned arrival of a child and life plans will take an unexpected turn as new parents. A struggle takes place mostly when the decision is made by the†¦show more content†¦Secondly, birth parent’s intense stress can continue into later years like on the child’s birthday and while they think of what type of person their son or daughter might have become under their care. For example, an adoptee might study and learn to play instruments very well with the adoptive parents, but if the child would have grown – up with his/her birth parents. They might would have been a great artist, but since this was not the case. The child may not develop those skills as the birth parents would have hoped. Through all this loss and guilt, the relationship among both parents may fall apart because of how each one feels about the adoption a nd their parent’s lack of support will distance them all even farther from one another. A major case is when the birth mother may have to leave her home and family due to pregnancy, which would degrade her educational and work status in the community. (Information Gateway) The birth parents have to encounter much hardship and denial to of most of an adoption plan, but more current issues, such as their shame, identity, and long- term issues effect them as well. Additionally, a feeling of shame can plague the minds of the birth parents because society will judge their decision as an act of neglect. Being ashamed to confess to parents, family, others, or friends will only cause more pain becauseShow MoreRelatedAdoption And The Law Of Adoption706 Words   |  3 PagesUnder the customary law of adoption which was in force afore the commencementof the Act, adoption is a nomination of a successor for the purport of inheritance. He doesnot lose all connections with the family of birth. 6 Effects of Adoption: Statutory Provision Section 12 of the Hindu Adoptions and Maintenance Act, 1956, relates to the Effectsof Adoption and the provision reads as under 7 : â€Å"12. Effects of Adoption – An adopted child shall be deemed to be the child of his or heradoptive fatherRead MoreAdoption Outline1472 Words   |  6 PagesAlyssa Fedor Outline Adoption in the U.S. I. INTRODUCTION A. (attention grabber): According to www.adoptionfacts.org, Approximately 140,000 children are adopted by American families each year. B. (thematic statement): Today we are going to inform you about adoption in the United States. C. (establish significance/credibility): According to www.childrensrights.org , The majority (42 percent) of children currently in foster care waiting to be adopted were removed from theirRead MoreFacts about Adoption vs. Abortion733 Words   |  3 Pagesabout Adoption vs. Abortion Outline Thesis: Information is distorted concerning womens rights concerning adoption and abortion. Facts: Adopted children who talk negative about adoption or talk about the natural mothers are considered to be selfish and inconsiderate. Many people feel the abortion rate would go up if the truth about adoption and its long term effects on mother and child were known. Adoption provides a divorce like situation on children between the natural family and theRead MoreFamily Of Origin And Our Family Culture Essay1681 Words   |  7 PagesThe term Family of Origin refers to the family that you grew up in - your parents and siblings, your original family. It may also include grandparents, other relatives, or other individuals who lived with you during part of your childhood. From our family we learn how to communicate, deal with our emotions, and get our needs met. We also learn many of our values and beliefs from our families. We often develop our sense of self in the context of our family of origin. Our family of origin or ourRead MoreThe Effects Of Children Adopted From Dissimilar Hereditary Family1371 Words   |  6 PagesMany families have no descendant of their own due to certain reasons and some desire to give some children a good opportunity. There are many families adopting different race children who have cross-culture living and in some cas es problems are appearing which affects their progress from childhood to adolescence. Starting with the increase in ethnic adoption, there will discussed possible causes and effects of the issue. The article observed that children adopted from dissimilar hereditary familyRead MoreThe Effect Of Interracial Adoption On A Child s Racial Identity933 Words   |  4 PagesThe Effect of Interracial Adoption On A Child’s Racial Identity In 1972 the National Association of Black Social Workers (NABSW) passed a resolution, which said, â€Å"Black children should be placed only with black families whether in foster care or adoption. Black children belong physically, psychologically and culturally in black families in order that they receive the total sense of themselves and develop a sound projection of their future.... Black children in white homes are cut off from the healthyRead MoreParents And Parents With Adoptees And Their Families1064 Words   |  5 PagesIn the journal article The Role of Siblings in Adoption Outcomes and Experiences From Adolescence to Emerging Adulthood the only biographical information about the authors is their names, the universities they are from, the departments, and their funding. The three authors are Rachel H. Farr from University of Kentucky and in the Department of Psychology. The other two authors are Margaux R. Flood and Harold D. Grotevant both from the University of Massachuse tts Amherst and in the Department of PshologicalRead MoreEssay about Abortion Is Murder1200 Words   |  5 Pagesabortion outlawed, these lives could have been saved and given the opportunity to live. Abortion is a form of murder, which is why it should be abolished. In addition, abortion can also lead to detrimental side effects, which are both physical and psychological. Finally, there are thousands of families who are waiting to adopt both healthy babies, but also children with disables. As a result, there is no reason for women to have abortions. In the case of the mother’s health, abortion is not justified sinceRead MoreA Need to Foster and Adoption1364 Words   |  5 Pages † To take a child of other parents legally as your own† is the definition of adoption in today’s society (merriam-webster). There are different types of adoption there is international and interracial. Various types of people can adopt a child, it does not matter if the person is black, white, Hispanic, gay, lesbian, poor, or rich these people can still adopt. There are several aspects to consider when adopting. A child could have emotional setback because of the care the child has receivedRead MoreOptions Other than Abortion Essay978 Words   |  4 Pageswanted or it’s not the right time to raise a baby; it is also one of the most controversial issues of our time. Abortion has it’s own effects on people and society mostly in a bad way. Church and other religious groups are against abortion, while others in our society are supporters. There are some options other than abortion to solve this issue, such as: adoption, teen parenting, and more. â€Å"How many more women will be exploited, injured or killed by abortion? More than 4,000 women choose to abort

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Felons Democracy and Equal Protection Clause Free Essays

Coleman Wahlborg Richard English IV, 1A 9 September 2011 Felons and Voting This year 5. 3 million people will be unable to vote not because they are mentally unable, not because they are underage, but because they are felons and ex-felons (Holding, 2006). Ex-felons are people who committed a felony and have served their punishment, dictated by the judiciary system, and are living in the community. We will write a custom essay sample on Felons: Democracy and Equal Protection Clause or any similar topic only for you Order Now When previous convicts are released from prison they are considered citizens again. Being a citizen, one is promised certain rights and responsibilities. As an ex felon one is a free citizen who can exercises the rights and responsibilities granted by the Constitution of the United States of America. Since former felons have earned their rights back shouldn’t this include voting? Whether ex-felons should be able to vote or not is a very popular issue among people. The two sides in the issue can be fairly biased. Some people might know felons that they think should be able to vote and others are on the other side of the argument. However, research says that there are several reasons why ex-felons should and shouldn’t be able to vote. The Fourteenth Amendment states, â€Å"no state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or the immunities of citizens in the United States. † This law sets forth that citizens have privileges and no one has the right to deprive citizens of these privileges. Current felons are not members of society, but previous felons’ civic rights are restored when they complete their sentence. Denying ex-felons the right to vote abolishes their rights (Krajick, 2004). Only two states allow current felons to vote, and ten states permanently prohibit former felons from voting (Zotti, 2000). This means that people who used poor judgment in the past, paid their debt to society, and were released from jail, are still being punished and shunned from being normal everyday citizens. Prohibiting ex-felon voting is not only a punishment to them, but also to society (Should felons be allowed to vote, 2008). The people of United States will be fortunate if 40% of eligible voters cast a ballot for the next presidential election (Holding, 2006). â€Å"Instead of prohibiting felon voting, we should require it† (Holding, 2006). We should be finding ways to get people to the polls, not keeping them away. Ex-felons who are going to return to their ways are not going to be interested in having a voice in the government. Individuals who are not already deterred from crime by the threat of confinement are not likely to be swayed by the prospect of losing their right to vote (Mauer, 2004). Individuals who have changed are the ones that want to vote, and the ones who have not changed will most likely wind up in the criminal justice system again â€Å"Voting is not a privilege; it is the basic right that defines a citizen. Those denied it are, in effect, stateless — people without a country† (Krajick, 2004). Voting is a right that defines a citizen in the since of when a person votes they are considered responsible and knowledgeable for not just complaining about the government but casting a vote to try to change things. When one does not vote, and is disconnected from the government in which they live, and they are stateless because they have no control over decisions that are made. The efforts to block ex-felons from voting makes those individuals feel more detached from society, which increases the chance that they will continue to break the law (Williams, 2010). Past felons feel they cannot get involved in their government because they are turned away, which essentially leads so many ex-felons to resort to their old ways. In 2000, the Alexander v. Mineta Supreme court case that dealt with the Equal Protection Clause came to the conclusion; â€Å"The Equal Protection Clause does not protect the right of all citizens to vote, but rather the right of all qualified citizens to vote. However, the Eighth Amendment prohibits excessive sanctions, and demands that punishment for crimes should be graduated and proportioned to the offense (Karlan, 2004). Therefore, felons who are released from jail have been punished for their crime; more punishment on their part is inhumane of society. The states that continue to exclude all felons permanently are outliers, within the United States and the world (Karlan, 2004). People who argue that ex felons should not have the right to vote believe that they have presented poor judgment and it is absurd to let them help in he choosing of our representatives (Carlson, 2006). This is agreeable to a certain extent, but when one takes a deeper look, the harsh answer is former convicts are stereotyped by most people. While these previous felons have presented poor judgment in the past, who is to say they will never change (Chapman, 2006)? The government lets ex-convicts marry, have children, drive and have the freedom of religion. In many places, the assumption is that ex-felons cannot be trusted to help choose our leader. If we thought criminals could never be reformed, we would never let them out in the first place (Chapman, 2006). There are many reasons why felons should be able to take place in the voting system; however there are reasons why they shouldn’t be able to. Felons become felons by presenting an act of poor judgment in most cases. Felons cannot vote for similar reasons that children can’t vote. â€Å"We don’t let children vote, for instance, or noncitizens, or the mentally incompetent. Why? Because we don’t trust them and their judgment. We have different reasons for not trusting them, but it seems to me that that is their common denominator† (Clegg, 2004). People who have committed crimes in their life have already shown us that they are not trustworthy people (Clegg, 2004). â€Å"And, as to equity, if you’re not willing to follow the rules yourself, you shouldn’t be able to make the rules for everyone else† (Clegg, 2004). Because voting determines in the long run who will make the rules for our country, there is no reason why the country should allow people who can’t follow the rules, vote on the rules. Now, I will freely concede that there are felons who ought to have their right to vote restored, but that should be done on a case-by-case basis, weighing (a) how serious the crime was, (b) how recently it was committed, (c) whether there has been a series/pattern of crimes, and (d) whether the individual has otherwise shown that he or she has turned his or her life around† (C legg, 2004). Clegg states that not all felons are in the same category. It is understandable that murderers should not be allowed to vote. On the other hand, some people really have gone through a long process to change their life around for the better. The right to vote is not granted to those under the age of eighteen. That age limitation demonstrates that voting rights may be restricted when there is reason to doubt the potential voter’s good judgment† (Latham, 2006). Latham shares similar ideas to Clegg on how the age limitation on voting and whether felons should be able to vote are connected due to prior judgment or lack there of. The interests of convicted felons might also differ from the primary interest of the American citizen body who want to be protected from criminals (Latham, 2006). A primary issue for the convicted felons as a whole is that 2/3 of felons released commit crimes within the next three years; not counting the ones that were not caught. Holding, Reynolds. â€Å"Why Can’t Felons Vote? – TIME. † Breaking News, Analysis, Politics, Blogs, News Photos, Video, Tech Reviews – TIME. com. 1 Nov. 2006. Web. 19 Oct. 2011. Krajick, Kevin. â€Å"Why Can’t Ex-Felons Vote? (washingtonpost. com). † Wahlborg 2 The Washington Post: National, World D. C. Area News and Headlines – The Washington Post. 18 Aug. 2004. Web. 19 Oct. 2011. http://www. washingtonpost. com/wp-dyn/articles/A9785- 2004Aug17. html How to cite Felons: Democracy and Equal Protection Clause, Papers

Monday, April 27, 2020

Portrait Of A Companies Success Essays - Strategic Management

Portrait Of A Companies Success Portrait of a Company's Success by Introduction One can hardly find a party without them, the Kelly products: Popcorn, chips, peanuts have been keeping the American Party flair going for more than 40 years. Kelly's is a brilliant Viennese company with a long traditional success story. The crunch-munch story began in Vienna during the post wartime, 1955. The US major Howard M. Kelly tried to find a way to stay in beautiful Vienna ? he met Herbert Rast. In 1955 nobody in Austria wanted to eat popcorn. And so the two of them showed the Austrians that eating popcorn in cinemas is a great experience. The two founded the first American popcorn company with the motto: ?If it doesn't work- it does not work?. This was said without having much business experience. They had no clue about facts and figures the only thing they knew that the price of popcorn in American cinemas was 10 cents. 10 Cents at that time was 2 shillings and that is the price they charged. The company expanded quickly and they soon saw that it is important to include potato chips. This was the start of a very funny way of American advertising that still continues today. There were 46 producers of popcorn, later there was 25 of them. And 10 years after that there was just Kelly's providing the market with the product. Not only did they have quality, they had the know-how to produce and distribute. In those days they drove to every wholesaler in small cars delivering the fresh product and collecting the outdated. They were always the best and remained till this day. The product line quickly grew, production needed more space and that is when Helmut Jordan entered the company. All the work paid off and the company needed a larger production infrastructure. The found the best suited place about 25 km south from Vienna in Fachstetten. There they rented a building 25 m long, and 70 m wide. It was pack ed with all the necessary departments: office space, warehouse, production facilities, packaging and loading docks for transporting. Very early on Balsen took over Kelly's but Kelly remained independent in Austrian business. Kelly took over other companies such as the biggest competitor Feldbacher with its well-known product such as sollettis and bretzels. In June 1997 Kelly moved into a new production and logistic facility, which was stationed in Vienna in the 22 districts. 400 million shillings were invested all the products were delivered much quicker and more efficiently from this new location. One can measure its success by the yearly delivered amount. Here in Austria more than 22 thousand 8 hundred tons of snacks are bought each year this equals to 3 kg of snacks per person. When one thinks of this in terms of packages that's more than 180 million packages that are sold each year of soletti and other Kelly products. This means that more than 400 thousand products from the Kelly family are purchased every day. 4703 trucks are necessary to transport a yearly production of Kelly's product. If one put the trucks end to end they would cover a distance from Vienna to Melk. To be able to produce so much a lot of raw materials are used. The raw materials are kept in a small and cool place because freshness is absolutely important. Kelly faithfully following strict rules and regulations of certain criteria deliver the best original quality. Every thing in this large hall is produced under the care and commitment of Manfred Furhacker. Based on out interview with Ing. Furhacker we can say that Kelly has 4 lines of production. The first line is popcorn the next three lines are there to produce peanut curls, zigeuner rings and other products. But let us now focus on popcorn. Kelly's high quality corn is delivered especially from the USA is it transferred almost automatically and pumped directly into the popcorn machines. It is then heated without any additional ingredients where it then pops and then lands on a large conveyer belt where it is then salted. Now nothing stands in the way of packaging it, transporting and eating it! Through and through the employees in

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Ebony and Amelia FTT essays

Ebony and Amelia FTT essays Several elements in the history present as possible causes of Ebonys failure to thrive (FTT). In a multivariate analysis, FTT between birth to 8 weeks of age is associated with maternal prenatal factors (such as a lack of transportation, socioeconomic class) and infant postnatal factors (weak sucking). While Ebony has had no significant physical symptoms, the birth weight of 4.9 kg equals macrosomia which can sometime be associated with weak sucking and slow feeding, which in turn can result in smaller quantities being expressed per feeding session and an increase in maternal fatigue. It would be difficult to continue to breast feed exclusively while working full time, without personal transportation and with another child to care for, and Tina should be congratulated for her tenacity in attempting to continue to breastfeed. While working full time, Tina has still had difficulty affording food at times, and it may be that her caloric intake is not enough to sustain adequate brea stfeeding for Ebony. Additionally, at six months it would be ideal to offer small solid feedings at six months, and it does not appear from the history that Tina has been able to start this yet. Several medical conditions could be contributing to Ebonys poor weight gain. The mere fact that there is not enough money could mean that Tina has continued to rely solely on breastfeeding at a time when Ebony needs to progress to more varied foods. Additionally, Ebony must be evaluated for any mechanical feeding difficulty, such as reflux, oromotor dysfunction, or central nervous system abnormality. Conditions which may contribute to Ebonys FTT which are not readily evident on physical examination include celiac disease, hyperthyroidism, chronic infection such as HIV, or metabolic disorders such as amino acid storage disorders. It would be helpful to obtain information on Ebonys eating and stooling patterns, whether or not she has ...

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Green Ash Tree Facts, Identification, and Management

Green Ash Tree Facts, Identification, and Management Green ash will reach a height of about 60 feet with a spread of 45 feet. Upright main branches bear twigs which droop toward the ground then bend upward at their tips much like Basswood. The glossy dark green foliage will turn yellow in the fall, but the color is often muted in the south. There is a good seed-set annually on female trees which are used by many birds but some consider the seeds to be messy. This fast-growing tree will adapt to many different landscape conditions and can be grown on wet or dry sites, preferring moist. Some cities have over-planted green ash. Specifics of the Green Ash Scientific name: Fraxinus pennsylvanicaPronunciation: FRACK-sih-nus pen-sill-VAN-ih-kuhCommon name(s): Green AshFamily: OleaceaeUSDA hardiness zones: 3 through 9AOrigin: Native to North AmericaUses: Large parking lot islands; wide tree lawns; recommended for buffer strips around parking lots or for median strip plantings in the highway; reclamation plant; shade tree;Availability: Generally available in many areas within its hardiness range. Native Range Green ash extends from Cape Breton Island and Nova Scotia west to southeastern Alberta; south through central Montana, northeastern Wyoming, to southeastern Texas; and east to northwestern Florida and Georgia. Description Leaf: Opposite, pinnately compound with 7 to 9 serrate leaflets that are lanceolate to elliptical in shape, entire leaf is 6 to 9 inches long, green above and glabrous to silky-pubescent below. Crown uniformity: Symmetrical canopy with a regular (or smooth) outline, and individuals have more or less identical crown forms. Trunk/bark/branches:  Grow mostly upright and will not droop; not particularly showy; should be grown with a single leader; no thorns. Breakage:  Susceptible to breakage either at the crotch due to poor collar formation, or the wood itself is weak and tends to break. Flower and Fruit Flower: Dioecious; light green to purplish, both sexes lacking petals, females occurring in loose panicles, males in tighter clusters, appear after the leaves unfold. Fruit: A single-winged, dry, flattened samara with a slender, thin seed cavity, maturing in autumn and dispersing over winter. Special Uses Green ash wood, because of its strength, hardness, high shock resistance, and excellent bending qualities is used in specialty items such as tool handles and baseball bats but is not as desirable as white ash. It is also a favorite tree used in city and yard landscapes. Several Green Ash Hybrids ‘Marshall Seedless’- some seeds, yellow fall color, fewer insect problems,; ‘Patmore’ - excellent street tree, straight trunk, good yellow fall color, seedless; ‘Summit’ - female, yellow fall color, straight trunk but pruning required to develop strong structure, abundant seeds, and flower galls can be a nuisance; ‘Cimmaron’ is a new plant (USDA hardiness zone 3) reported to have a strong trunk, good lateral branching habit, and tolerance to salt. Damaging Pests Borers: Common on Ash and they can kill trees. The most common borers infesting Ash are Ash borer, lilac borer, and carpenterworm. Ash borer bores into the trunk at or near the soil line causing tree dieback. Anthracnose: also called leaf scorch and leaf spot. Infected parts of the leaves turn brown, especially along the margins. Infected leaves fall prematurely. Rake up and destroy infected leaves. Chemical controls are not practical or economical on large trees. Trees in the south can be severely affected. The Most Widely Distributed   Green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), also called red ash, swamp ash, and water ash  is the most widely distributed of all the American ashes. Naturally a moist bottomland or stream bank tree, it is hardy to climatic extremes and has been widely planted in the Plains States and Canada. The commercial supply is mostly in the South. Green ash is similar in property to white ash and they are marketed together as white ash. The large seed crops provide food to many kinds of wildlife. Due to its good form and resistance to insects and disease, it is a very popular ornamental tree.

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Imagine that you are hanny write a letter to the roadman thank him for Essay

Imagine that you are hanny write a letter to the roadman thank him for his help tell him your real reason for doing this job - Essay Example A few months ago I met a gentleman by the name of Franklin P Scudder, who was in the knowledge of a German plot against England and who solicited my services. Sad to say, but when I returned to my premises after some time, I found Scudder murdered in cold blood. I decided to run away into hiding for many reasons. First I was scared that the people who murdered Scudder will also murder me. Second, I believed that the police will suspect me for the murder of Scudder. Third I wanted to get to the depth of the conspiracy narrated to me by Scudder. When I met you, I was actually being pursued by both the police and the German spies. It was only because of your help that I survived and managed to unravel this conspiracy against Britain, well in time. Thanks a lot for whatever you did for me and the country. Sincere regards, Richard Hannay.